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Michael Steinhart

Forrester: AWS & Azure in Tight Race for Cloud Dev

Michael Steinhart
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Michael.Steinhart
Michael.Steinhart
9/30/2013 3:23:42 PM
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Re: Very Interesting Analysis, Great For Business & Consumers
This conversation should be happening/continuing on my blog from today: Cloud Collaboration Defines New Normal.

 

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Chris B
Chris B
9/30/2013 2:51:35 PM
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Re: Very Interesting Analysis, Great For Business & Consumers
Dropbox is especially nice because it is integrated into so many 3rd party apps.  Dropbox is finally offering a business version, but I don't think it has much traction yet and it is priced pretty steeply. I believe there are self hosted file sharing services but they don't have the same mass integration that Dropbox has.

Are you aware of any businesses that use the biz version of Dropbox?

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dstrait
dstrait
9/29/2013 7:50:34 PM
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Re: Very Interesting Analysis, Great For Business & Consumers
I haven't been terribly succesful in this field, myself. I've consoled myself by decided that many people are simply hoarders.

Keeping files in a folder or file share somewhere is just so easy to do. It sets a sort of minimum-energy level. Doing anythng else requires more work and that is an immediate turn-off for most people, even if there are added benefits. Unless they can easily integrate a system into their work flow, they will fight it. The best thing would be invisible. You would just save your files, and perhaps a dialog box would pop up, show you what's changed between what you've added and what existed previously ad demanded some sort of comment.

I've seen situations where the "real" documents are somewhere outside of version control and the VCS/repository is only updated infrequently, usually near some sort of a release date. They lose the collaborative facility that a central repository provides, there can be problems integrating changes if they come from several different authors and they lose the stream of commenting on changes as they occur. I've seen otherwise competent (and even good) development teams just zip up their source code files and dump them in some folder in a VCS (with a comment like "Added changes for Version 2.1") and claim that they use version control for theiir files.

My only advise is to make the process as minimially invasive as possible. I think that is why online storage (for usre files) didn't really take off until DropBox and similar tools came along. FTP has been around for decades, but it requires extra work to setup or use. DropBox just sort of happens.

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Chris B
Chris B
9/22/2013 1:46:15 PM
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Re: Very Interesting Analysis, Great For Business & Consumers
@dstrait Any suggestions on how we can get users to relinquish their own mini-fiefdom of locally stored documents?  I've setup document control systems before but it was nearly impossible to get users to abandon their local documentation and rely on a central store of official versions.

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dstrait
dstrait
9/22/2013 12:32:48 PM
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Platinum
Re: Very Interesting Analysis, Great For Business & Consumers
As far as the failure of wikis goes, I think that people feel better about keeping their data in files (like Word docx files) than they do about sticking it into a database with lots of other content. With files, they feel like they own something. Wikis feel more...tenuous, somehow.

Years ago, I saw a simlar situation in files vs. printouts. Every developer I knew had stacks of printed-out programs and data piled around their cubicles even though they could just keep as many copies as they wanted on shared storage somewhere.

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Chris B
Chris B
9/10/2013 11:01:31 PM
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Re: Very Interesting Analysis, Great For Business & Consumers
Ah yes I nearly forgot about the Wiki movement.  Always seemed like a great concept but nobody seemed to commercialize it into something a bit more polished. In the end it was too rough around the edges for the average user to fully embrace.

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dstrait
dstrait
9/6/2013 2:34:59 PM
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Platinum
Re: Very Interesting Analysis, Great For Business & Consumers
Yes. If not Sharepoint, then what? Another thing is that SP seems to go into a couple of directions. Different people think it's for different things. It's for wikis, it's for web sites, it's for document collaboration, it's for workflow, it's where you put your old Access databases.

Wikimedia, markup and that sort of thing seem to drive civilians (non-nerdy people) crazy. The CMS/wiki craze seems to have died down since the mid-2000s.

MS seems to have been pretty successful at positioning SP as a replacement for old-style file shares, and the new Skydrive Pro stuff seems to cement that. I've used Samba a bunch of times for file sharing and that worked out fine, but samba doesn't really have an answer to SP or accessing files accross open Internet.

The workflow stuff seems like a winner, but the few people that I know that have actually worked with it find it lacking.

As a document repository, it always drove me nuts. I wanted it to work like a programmer's version control system (CVS, subversion, TFS or something along those lines) but it works more like Visual Source Safe or SCCS, but it's harder to use. It does seem to have stolen a lot of share from Documentum, though.

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Chris B
Chris B
8/29/2013 1:54:20 AM
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Platinum
Re: Very Interesting Analysis, Great For Business & Consumers
@dstrait Frankly I'm amazed that SharePoint is as used as it is because I've never talked to anyone that has actually like it or thought it was a good product.  I suppose it's just the complete and total lack of competition that has allowed SharePoint to secure it's place in corporate IT.

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dstrait
dstrait
8/28/2013 4:03:48 PM
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Platinum
Re: Very Interesting Analysis, Great For Business & Consumers
I've spent many years working as DBA and I've been pretty aggressive with a lot of third party databases, including some fairly complicated things (Siebel). I stay away from SP databases, even on single-server installations. In fact, I'd rather that the SP databases were well away from "my" databases. Things that are standard best-practice tactics seem to enrage SharePoint.

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Chris B
Chris B
8/23/2013 11:05:14 PM
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Platinum
Re: Very Interesting Analysis, Great For Business & Consumers
That's interesting they are pushing SharePoint as SaaS over Azure.  I've deployed SharePoint a number of times and can attest to the headaches caused by trying to customize security and attempts at tinkering with the database have no doubt made more than one IT admin pull out their hair.

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