Home    Bloggers    Messages    Polls    Resources
Tw  |  Fb  |  In  |  G+  |  Rss
Michael Steinhart

Ubuntu Pushes Open Cloud Platforms

Michael Steinhart
dstrait
dstrait
10/19/2013 11:34:42 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Ubuntu 13.10 Twitter Chat
Windows still seems to be a better choice for 'accidental' adminstrators than any version of linux. (I say this as a person who has spent plenty of time running linux on my homelab systems, but I've never convinced anyone to pay me for it.) It might even be better for junior administrators. My sense is that the people who write the checks would rather spend less on adminstrators that know arcana than they spend on operating system licensing and adminstrators that might be a bit more fungible. Another way to say that is: if you hire more technically adept people, you might be able to spend less on your infrastructure but you might have a harder time replacing those people when you have to (or when you are trying to scale up in headcount).

I know that ubuntu has labored mightily over the years to defang a lot of the painful parts of linux. I'm not familiar at all with unbuntu as a server environment, but it seems easier to run any form of linux as a server because the problem of software drivers for oddball equipment and fancy video cards isn't nearly as much of an issue. If you are running in a virtualized environment, the virtual hardware that is exposed to your OS is old and/or generic and well-supported, so there is even less of a problem.

Does ubuntu's success in the "client" or workstation space translate to easier administration of servers? Have things improved from the "edit the config file with vi and restart the samba deamon" era? Is it still "google it" for most problems, where some of the advice you find will be wrong, some will be right, some of it will be "just learn to code and fix it yourself", some of it will be "you are asking the wrong question" and most of it will merely be out of date? Businesses don't deal well with that kind of chaos.

50%
50%
MeredithLEaton
MeredithLEaton
10/14/2013 12:10:07 PM
User Rank
Steel
Ubuntu 13.10 Twitter Chat
For anyone interested in learning more about Ubuntu 13.10 for cloud, there's a Twitter chat happening on @ubuntucloud this Wednesday (10/16), using the hashtag #1310chat. It should be a good chance to ask any questions you may have about the new update and hear more about the latest features. 

100%
0%
Chris B
Chris B
10/14/2013 6:08:20 AM
User Rank
Platinum
The hand that feeds you
@dstrait I think you are absolutely correct about traditional server manufacturers opting out of MS and siding with the Linux, open-source side of things.  MS for many years refused to get into the hardware business precisely because they didn't want to irritate their loyal customer base of PC manufacturers on both the consumer and server side of things.  This created a gaping hole for low-cost manufacturers running free open-source solutions to undercut prices which ended up eroding MS's share in the marketplace and decimating big name PC manufacturers.

I bet in hindsight that MS probably wishes that would have switched to the Apple model of hardware and software manufacturing a few years earlier.  Now they are forced to play catch up in an ever more fast paced market. Being the two-ton elephant that they are, momentum carried them a long way in the wrong direction and turning that ship around has proven to be difficult if not impossible, though I imagine if they ever get headed in the right direction that the momentum from their massive size will no doubt carry them a long long ways, though if the market decides to shift again their momentum will once again be to their disadvantage.

100%
0%
dstrait
dstrait
10/13/2013 7:21:34 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Open-source likely means portability
There is no substitute for people who know what they are doing, or can figure out what your vendor is doing.

 

I think that Windows is increasingly vulnerable. Microsoft is repositioning itself as a device manufacturer and this puts the classic server manufacturers (Dell and HP) firmly in the crosshairs. From the other side, contract vendors are selling to the large customers (AWS, Google, etc.), who don't buy servers from Dell or HP anymore.

HP in particular seems to be feeling that the good old days of Wintel are over, with an executive recently complaining that Microsoft is moving to become a direct competitor. In that scneario, if HP thinkis it can make money by selling Linux, OpenStack and servers, they are going to do so even at risk of irritating Microsoft.

100%
0%
Chris B
Chris B
10/11/2013 4:10:22 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Open-source likely means portability
It seems that at least on the heavy hitting server side of things that open source is almost becoming the de facto standard and I doubt the tides will shift back to proprietary closed systems any time soon.  I'm not sure that it would even be possible to setup a new datacenter today without using at least some open source code somewhere in the stack.  

That being said, aftersales support is always the issue with opensource projects.  You've either got to staff your IT department with uber geeks or consider buying something off the shelf.  However, as long as you go with the big names like Ubuntu there are plenty of consulting firms that can provide you with support for a hefty fee of course.

100%
0%
Michelle Greenlee
Michelle Greenlee
10/9/2013 9:19:31 AM
User Rank
Gold
Re: Open-source likely means portability
After sales support has been lacking with proprietary systems I've used. I'm better off taking care of things on my own some days.

100%
0%
hash.era
hash.era
10/9/2013 7:01:27 AM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Open-source likely means portability
@michelle: Yes most of us would say a big YES to it but we have to consider the aftersales and support factors of it too. Just getting something free will not fit for a long time goal. You do need to make it run for much as you can and for that to happen you do need a good after sales support and service.  

100%
0%
Michelle Greenlee
Michelle Greenlee
10/8/2013 10:02:12 PM
User Rank
Gold
Re: Open-source likely means portability
I feel that way too especially after using a collection of proprietary systems through the years.

100%
0%
jagibbons
jagibbons
10/8/2013 7:36:39 PM
User Rank
Platinum
Open-source likely means portability
As we were discussing in an earlier comment thread, I tend to think that open source is probably the safest bet for being as portable as possible and not being locked into a single vendor's platform. With data moving from cloud provider to cloud provider and new entrants to the market (as well as acquisitions) all the time, open source continues to be a safer bet than putting all your chips into one vendor's pile.

100%
0%
More Blogs from Michael Steinhart
After a 10-month run as editor in chief, Michael Steinhart moves from The Enterprise Cloud Site to another UBM publication.
The competing giants aim their products at different segments of the enterprise IT world.
According to our last poll, most of our audience is happy to attend IT expos and trade shows, as long as the registration fees are waived.
SolarWinds head geek Lawrence Garvin explains why companies must increase IT security awareness across all employees and departments.
A new report shows that IT professionals aren't happy with their security information event management (SIEM) tools.
Digital Audio
Latest Archived Broadcast

Michael Biddick, CEO of Fusion PPT and a speaker at the upcoming Interop and Cloud Connect Summit events, is joining The Enterprise Cloud Site community to share his advice on making a hybrid cloud work for your organization on Thursday, March 27, 2014, at 1:00 p.m. (Eastern).

flash poll
Live Video
On-demand Video with Chat
What lessons can today's enterprises learn from federal cloud intiatives -- successful and less so?
follow us on twitter
like us on facebook
The Enterprise Cloud Site
About Us     Contact Us     Help     Register     Twitter     Facebook     RSS